Saturday, October 14, 2000

Trenching the Farrenburg Lineament

Shot with WLA's 2.1mp Olympus C-2000Z

Monday, October 2. We had a two week field schedule.

John Baldwin and I (and a 90 pound bag of surveying gear) traveled to New Madrid, Missouri to investigate a geomorphic feature near Farrenburg. It was my second trip with John for this type of work on Sikeston Ridge. I rented a guitar from a Memphis music store.

Cotton field, looking west towards our home.
Cotton field sunset, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Several days had passed. We opened and flagged two trenches. We arrived during harvest this year. The John Deere's proximity to our trench and the Topcon Total Station was unnerving.
Cotton picker, Topcon total station,  New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We were surveying when a blimp appeared. It was a strange sight. Got the prism too.
Blimp while surveying, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Once we surveyed our flagging we began logging our interpretation. John Baldwin takes a closer look.
John Baldwin, geologist, taking a closer look
Here's the trench, flagging, and the Intrepid.
Southern Farrenburg trench, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We had a penchant for RedMan in the field. I have a penchant for goofy poses (and Prism Kites. Cotton ball.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, cotton picker, Prism kite fan
Roy Van Arsdale, Sue Cashman, and John Baldwin review the exposure. Days later, John snapped me in the trench.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, works in the trench
We became friends with Lynn and ____ working on their land the year before. They invited us for dinner and a party. A young friend of the family offered to take me up to photograph our site.
Andrew D. Barron flies over New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Mississippi River, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Looking over our northern trench.

Here is the Farrenburg lineament, looking south towards the Mississippi. Our trenches are in the middle.
Farrenburg lineament, New Madrid Missouri, October 2000
We had finished logging, had a trench review. We tentatively concluded that our lineament was an impressive sand blow, likely formed during the 1811-1812 earthquakes.
Trench, Farrenburg lineament, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
October 14, 2000. Our work at the site was finished. We hired Larry Hamilton to excavate and close our trenches. The Mayor of nearby Lilbourn, Larry was a lot of fun to work with.
Larry Hamilton, Hamilton Plumbing, Lilbourn, Missouri, October 2000
Larry gave us a few lessons on the backhoe; here's John.
John Baldwin backfills Farrenburg trench, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We did a half a day of reconnaissance along the Commerce Geophysical Lineament.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, investigates some fine sands
One night we enjoyed sunset on the Mississippi river.

John rebooked his flight and was headed home early. I kept the car and began thinking of a Nashille adventure. I shot a few photos of our home away from home in New Madrid, used by CERI staff installing the GPS network in the region.
Cricket guest, CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Smelled funny in there. Great decor, too. We liked this house.
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
And down the road I go.
Headed to Memphis from New Madrid, October, 2000

1 comment:

  1. Nice work you guys! That's hard core trenching! maybe next time we could jam with you. You can just my site for details. We'd be happy to work with you!

    ReplyDelete

Search This Blog

Blog Archive