Saturday, November 27, 2010

Pizza!

I always wanted to make pizza like my sister. My tastes were different when I was 7 and the Appian Way kit was a treat. While making this 'substitute' she told of dramatically different pizza came from her New Hampshire early years.

Random things happen that stick. I happened to be in front of a TV show comparing Chicago style pizzas last fall. I think it was firemen from New York versus Chicago. Pretty much cemented for me to pursue Italian-style pizza. The secret is sure to be the crust. Soon I found this recipe, and promptly became confused; anyone would. I rewrote it to remove the 'threaded' options; a very badly written recipe with very good results! The crust is the hero here but I forgot to photograph it properly.

While in Kentucky, the best pizza was a take and bake from Papa Murphy's. It was some twist of coincidence that the exclusively west coast chain wound up with a founding owner retired to Owensboro. I'm saying that I had settled for bland take-and-bake pizzas that were quite worse than the foo foo (and delicious) pizza I had while living in the Bay Area. Arriving here in this tiny community, the pizza is altogether quite bad. There you have the entire back story as to why I became a pizza maestro in the last month.

3 shot mosaic.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/26/10

Starting with a quart of tomatoes we grew, picked and canned this summer, slow cooked into pizza sauce, adding a touch of fresh basil.
Agness tomatoes simmer down, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/26/10
I made four styles with this marguerite being most photogenic.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/26/10
Photo by Randy with the d5000.

The rain pours. Sprits are low, or perhaps suspended animation. Water for coffee boils in front of the window, anticipating a fresh cup of Peets.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Kiwi leaf, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Kiwi leaf, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Lately I've been reading about lenses, exposures, cameras going out of production, (namely my d5000), bokeh, and probably other things. The intermittent sunshine was great to shoot in today, but it rained hard for the most part.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
I went down to Bailey Beach and here are two shots that I ran through Topaz Adjust. Yesterday I wrote "I'm sort of Anti Photoshop," today I immediately contradict myself.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
[d5k:6748]Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
They were interesting shots before, but the filters do bring a lot of punch to them. Okay, now the self-conscious bokeh shots. First, rain on the windshield.
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
I went down to the thrift store. There was a lot of junk. I think his kit lens does a nice job with bokeh at 35mm, but what do I know? It certainly does more than this 110, similar the Kodak110 that captured my early childhood. Sadly, this camera went to the trash with another 50 or so 'junk' cameras (I didn't find out until 12/18 about the others that went).
Ophir School 110, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
So, back with the Topaz filters. Very cool, very stylized, very 'black box'. These were perfect shots to run through it I bet.
Up Euchre creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
This image has no Topaz, but I did shoot it RAW which produced a very different looking image than the .jpg
Euchre creek marsh, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10

Mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©11/27/10
I'm not sure which of the presets I chose on these. I ran each one separately, leaning towards 'Vibrance' and 'Exposure Correction'. It's the 'make more intense' filter, or 'like that famous artist they used in those Nestle Alpine White candy bar commercials' (Maxfield Parrish). It is a fine set of tools that I like today. They seem a good value at $50. I could see mixing the 'Topazed' version with the original for just a tad of the filter-y-ness.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Search This Blog

Blog Archive