Friday, December 31, 2010

Black and White 2010

Mid afternoon coffee, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
It has been an extraordinary year for photography. There are lots of directions I am excited about. Large format 4"x5" film photography? We'll see! Also looking forward to shooting with my land camera 320 and instant film negative transfers. I have my eye out for a Nikon 35mm and look forward to trying Fuji Velvia film.


I appreciate my blog readers. I wouldn't mind more direct interaction (Idaho?); you can always email me directly, andrewdbarron@gmail.com, or comment at flickr.

Assembled chronological portfolio for my 2010 black and white images. Click the image to see!
Andrew D. Barron ©/10

Pistil Thursday / All Night / Sunrise

First time up Starkweather road, in the 'hood.
Madrone above Ophir, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Cypress above Ophir, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Above Ophir, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Earlier this week I heard from hipstamatic blogger xolager. Looking at the pics there, I noticed a missing piece of my arsenal: the Williamsburg hipstapak with Pistil film and Helga Viking lens. Another 99¢ gone. This wood pile was shot 9/12/2010 one a two.
Ancient wood pile, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Patterson Bridge, Gold Beach, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Backgammon, Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
Andrew D. Barron ©12/30/10
I haven't said it before, but the way I found the Hipstamatic was that I thought there were physical cases for the iphone that made it look like a camera. That's not the way it works (duh) but there are interesting Leica-ish covers for the phones. Here's one less cool than the hand made one below:
[iphone Leica IIIf sticker drawn by Suguru Nishioka: image removed without a trace]


Crescent moon and planet,Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Crescent moon and planet, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Tree, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Rogue River Reef from the Old Coast Road.
Rogue River Reef from the Old Coast Road, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Wave at Kissing Rock, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Wave at Kissing Rock, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Wave at Kissing Rock, Andrew D. Barron ©12/31/10
Mid afternoon coffee

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Rolled to Blanco

Nesika gas, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/28/10
Cape Blanco, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Cape Blanco, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Cape Blanco, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Cape Blanco, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Sixes river, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Sixes river, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
The Hughes House, Cape Blanco, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
Hughes House, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/29/10
The Hughes House was built in 1898. Here's a 1941 photo of the Hughes House by Ben Maxwell, one year before electricity arrived at the property:
Hughes House, Curry County, OR, Ben Maxwell ©7/4/41
This 3.6" x 4.7" negative was scanned 1/17/2003. Maxwell (1898-1967) was a Salem-based photographer. I've been aware of his work for about 5 years but accidentally found it again tonight. You can read more about Ben Maxwell.

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Reformat notice / Film Photography Podcast

Cactus, Andrew D. Barron ©12/28/10
I redid last January's blogs in the newer 'big image' format. In a few cases, I chose a different aspect ratio, deleted a few variations, and adjusted some levels. It was an exciting and prolific month with 255 'released' images of the 2,886 I shot. A few months in 2010 surpassed this number, but last January's shots are some of the most rich and varied I captured with the H1.

I honestly can't believe how long I stuck with poor workflow at some stages of my photography. Making a new online album for each new batch of photos was a bad idea I kept for 4 years. "Save for web" and blasting out the Exif data? Oh, yeah, also dumb, but did it for 4 years. Easily remedied. There's more to learn with post-shoot white balance adjustments. Chromatic aberration correction was something I once considered 'just there' but there may be ways to clean it up. I've been patching up stuff like that lately.
Michael Raso and Duane Polcou entertain, teach, and share their love of photography in the Film Photography Podcast title=
Been enjoying the Film Photography Podcast while I plow through the html-tedium I've assigned to myself. The podcast has many episodes, and for me, there's a spooky alignment with their perspective about photography, cameras, art, even down to the music and cultural references they make. The show may not be for everyone, but I sure like it. Michael digs his polaroid and 110 cameras, while Duane seems very well informed about the film technology of the pre-digital era. I have a funny feeling I met Duane during my only trip to Arizona's national parks in early June 1997. After 10pm or so in a Bryce Canyon? campground, I wandered out with my guitar seeking a lively campfire. I met another musician who said he was out there because he was a photographer. I asked naively, "like what, 35mm?" and he said, no, ' large format' camera. The way that guy said camera was what stuck. He held his hands up and said, 'it's a big camera with a big negative like this,' hands gesturing a 4x5 rectangle. Was it a New Jersey accent? I may never confirm this chance encounter as being Duane from FPP, the guy who used to shoot 4x5 in the summers in the late 90's in Arizona, but I'm sure curious.

I got back into flickr; you can find me there, too. I consolidated my pre-2010 blog here in 'barronphotography' as well. You'll see more blogs in the archive listings below. This will help (eventually) to treat the older pictures to my new format. Google Chrome browser: I've used since it came out, but as of today, I am using Opera for blog edits. Chrome resizes images always. Images are the whole point of the blog, so I'm not going to use a tool that changes them. Firefox or Explorer? Nope. Evolutionary bloat has plagued every Mozilla and MS browser since the beginning: the 'new' version comes out, and 4 updates or so later, it's slower than the version it replaced.

I recently redid March (with 181 shots) but didn't make an announcement, so that leaves about five other 2010 months, and three other years. Prior to 2009, I shot about 1/4 of what I do these days, so it's not too overwhelming.

Here's last January.
1/3: New Year, new blog
1/8: January 7-8
1/9: January 9
1/12: Late morning clearing
1/13: Lunchtime clearing
1/14: Scramble in the woods
1/18: Mighty storm
1/20: January 20
1/22: Two days: Ridin' out El NiƱo
1/23: Nice morning...
1/26: Great morning walk-and-shoot
1/31: Oregon January

My favorite blog is this group is Scramble in the woods, because there was incredible light and memorable experiences: punishment-by-brush, losing my mini tripod, and destroying a pair of jeans.

If I had to choose a favorite image from January 2010:
Ophir beach wave, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/18/10
I ran out as the waves receded. I had the zoom arbitrarily out to 399 mm (11x); this seems that I stopped futzing with the camera to get the shot and stay dry. I crouched down as far as I could and shot without looking through the viewfinder. That was pretty common after the LCD broke in October '09. I got pretty good at shooting blind, and the H1 stayed good at focusing quickly on the right thing.

I suspect I will redo the black & white conversion again some day. This image printed beautifully at 6.75"x12".
Ophir beach wave, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©7/03/10
It's not bad as a color image.
Ophir beach wave, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/18/10

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Sunday randoms

Through the 10x hand lens.
Money tree, Andrew D. Barron ©12/25/10
Flat Italian parsley, Andrew D. Barron ©12/25/10
My first hot buttered rum. Delish.
Hot buttered rum, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
There was an incredible storm last night with thunder and lighting very close.
Morning after, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Day after movie, Crescent City.
Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Credits roll on True Grit. The reel they had was scratched throughout; one green vertical scratch from floor to ceiling.
True Grit credits on projector, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Turns out the amazing 20"x24" Polaroid camera was used for some production stills of the actors on the set of True Grit by Mary Ellen Mark. See story here
Hard rain, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Hard rain, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Broken ornament, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
iPhone accident.
Closed, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
Bell peppers, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10
This guy beat the pants off of my 'yellow light' shots. That's probably because it's staged.
, Andrew D. Barron ©12/26/10

Friday, December 24, 2010

Friday experiments

Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, Figure 2

In 1995, I learned about CCDs as the underlying technology for Landsat satellite imagery. My professor was a former defense mapping agency employee and a great teacher. We were taught a lot about lenses, parallax, and all kinds of optical stuff as it relates to remote sensing. Two years later, I was working under a former Apollo Mission scientist. I borrowed and pored endlessly over a wonderful tome called the Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, by Bowker and Hughes (NASA SP-206). The book detailed the remarkable feat of remote sensing and analog/digital technology to inform our space program. Nowadays, you can easily see the same book (pages 5-9) in this pdf. I marveled at the film technology used in the Lunar Orbiter missions. These satellites generated the foundation imagery for the manned lunar missions. They used a film camera, and an onboard, in orbit film developer, digitizer, and transmitter. This was before the Apollo missions flew, 1966-67. The digitized bits were returned to earth and were re-analoged onto strips of film and mosaics were composited.
Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, Figure 5

1999 Sony MVC-FD91, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
A friend had this old Sony MVC-FD91, and after my recent look into the history of CCDs, I was surprised it turned up when it did.
1999 Sony MVC-FD91, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The big goofy floppy drive is a good match for my old Powerbook 1400.
1996 Powerbook 1400cs, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I used a pretty crappy camera of similar vintage years ago, but this relic is fun to shoot with. I'm transported to a time when seeing a digital image was new. The floppy disk spins and the letters "MAVICA" scroll through like a slot machine and writes the image. The camera has 1024x768 resolution and an amazing lens; 14x optical zoom that is pretty snappy. Here's a test shot, with it's younger brother ('06 H1) take on the right.
Wave breaks, Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The battery lasts about 5 minutes, but that's all it takes to fill up the disk: 6-15 shots! It is fun to shoot with, but can you imagine the $999 this thing went for in 1999? This camera would have been a bit of a let down in image quality, but it has the feel of a polaroid with a real digital image. I wonder how many early ebay auctions were shot with this model.

FD91 & H1:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
iphone & d5000:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
For it's time, the MVC-91 must've been a breakthrough. Indeed, the 2006 DSC-H1 inherited the same general feel and camera body symbols. It's like driving around an old car. Not quite as nice, but you can appreciate it for what it is: a cool old digital camera.

More evidence that the Hipstamatic can make anything look kind of cool:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10

I was glad I had my H1 out, because I caught this:
Waves at mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The surf was as high as I've ever seen it, rushing up through the mouth of the creek to the eroding bank.
Mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
North towards Sisters Rocks, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Rifling through a box of stuff to find the floppy drive for my old laptop to download the FD91's pictures, I had an idea: a geologist's hand lens TOTALLY works as an iphone macro lens. Bausch & Lomb hastings triplets are great hand lenses in their own right. I should've remembered. Check out the with and without shots:
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I didn't move the phone, but took out the hand lens.
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The lens of the iphone camera is tiny enough that it fits well inside the hand lens.
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Sour cream, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Cranberries, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I tried for the dog's eye, but it was on a long exposure. This trippy image came out.
The eye of Ruby, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10


I recently consolidated my older blog here. It's a lot of work to reprocess the photos, but I did one: December 27, 2007.

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