Friday, December 24, 2010

Friday experiments

Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, Figure 2

In 1995, I learned about CCDs as the underlying technology for Landsat satellite imagery. My professor was a former defense mapping agency employee and a great teacher. We were taught a lot about lenses, parallax, and all kinds of optical stuff as it relates to remote sensing. Two years later, I was working under a former Apollo Mission scientist. I borrowed and pored endlessly over a wonderful tome called the Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, by Bowker and Hughes (NASA SP-206). The book detailed the remarkable feat of remote sensing and analog/digital technology to inform our space program. Nowadays, you can easily see the same book (pages 5-9) in this pdf. I marveled at the film technology used in the Lunar Orbiter missions. These satellites generated the foundation imagery for the manned lunar missions. They used a film camera, and an onboard, in orbit film developer, digitizer, and transmitter. This was before the Apollo missions flew, 1966-67. The digitized bits were returned to earth and were re-analoged onto strips of film and mosaics were composited.
Lunar Orbiter Photographic Atlas of the Moon, Figure 5

1999 Sony MVC-FD91, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
A friend had this old Sony MVC-FD91, and after my recent look into the history of CCDs, I was surprised it turned up when it did.
1999 Sony MVC-FD91, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The big goofy floppy drive is a good match for my old Powerbook 1400.
1996 Powerbook 1400cs, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I used a pretty crappy camera of similar vintage years ago, but this relic is fun to shoot with. I'm transported to a time when seeing a digital image was new. The floppy disk spins and the letters "MAVICA" scroll through like a slot machine and writes the image. The camera has 1024x768 resolution and an amazing lens; 14x optical zoom that is pretty snappy. Here's a test shot, with it's younger brother ('06 H1) take on the right.
Wave breaks, Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The battery lasts about 5 minutes, but that's all it takes to fill up the disk: 6-15 shots! It is fun to shoot with, but can you imagine the $999 this thing went for in 1999? This camera would have been a bit of a let down in image quality, but it has the feel of a polaroid with a real digital image. I wonder how many early ebay auctions were shot with this model.

FD91 & H1:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
iphone & d5000:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
For it's time, the MVC-91 must've been a breakthrough. Indeed, the 2006 DSC-H1 inherited the same general feel and camera body symbols. It's like driving around an old car. Not quite as nice, but you can appreciate it for what it is: a cool old digital camera.

More evidence that the Hipstamatic can make anything look kind of cool:
Looking north at the mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10

I was glad I had my H1 out, because I caught this:
Waves at mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The surf was as high as I've ever seen it, rushing up through the mouth of the creek to the eroding bank.
Mouth of Greggs Creek, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
North towards Sisters Rocks, Curry County OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Rifling through a box of stuff to find the floppy drive for my old laptop to download the FD91's pictures, I had an idea: a geologist's hand lens TOTALLY works as an iphone macro lens. Bausch & Lomb hastings triplets are great hand lenses in their own right. I should've remembered. Check out the with and without shots:
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I didn't move the phone, but took out the hand lens.
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
The lens of the iphone camera is tiny enough that it fits well inside the hand lens.
Bausch & Lomb 10x Hastings Triplet as iPhone macro lens, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Sour cream, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
Cranberries, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10
I tried for the dog's eye, but it was on a long exposure. This trippy image came out.
The eye of Ruby, Andrew D. Barron ©12/24/10


I recently consolidated my older blog here. It's a lot of work to reprocess the photos, but I did one: December 27, 2007.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Search This Blog

Blog Archive