Sunday, December 12, 2010

Polaroid / Port Orford evening

Instant photography, Ophir thrift style. In three visits hoping to find the Konica, I put these randomly distributed cameras on the same shelf. A Kodak Pleaser, a pair of Polaroid Sun600 LMS (’83-’9?), and a Polaroid 320 (’69-71) await purchase by some hopelessly curious photographer. People are doing very cool things with Fuji’s pack film and as of July 2010, you can get The Impossible Project film, available at Photojojo. Here is an article about the project.

In tonight’s internet scour about these dinosaur cameras, I found the wonderful Polaroid album of Bob Merco. I especially like this tree and chair, both shot with a Polaroid 103 on Fuji FP100C film with a wide angle lens in the fall of 2010. Our chair shots appear to have an affinity: Maurine’s chair and two empty chairs, (see Bob’s chair pair). Today was not my first peer into the world of instant cameras. While housesitting in Lone Pine in July, there were two great looking cameras there; a grandfather’s SX-70 and Polaroid Land Camera 100 similar to the 320 below (shot with the Vint B&W camera for iPhone). I investigated the value and modern mods back then. Check out this ad for the SX-70!
Instant cameras, Ophir, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10


I’m reminded of Polaroid I-zone cameras we had in our family around Christmas near 2000, perhaps ’99 when introduced. They made tiny instant pictures on little stickers. Also in 2000, polaroid images were used as a critical storytelling device in Memento, particularly the unforgettable opening scene. Guy Pearce’s character Leonard Shelby shoots with a sonar focusing Polaroid SLR 690 in the movie.

We had another pizza night. Delizioso! But for some reason I only got shots of a cool old stove and a map on the wall. Alternate with my good camera.
Classic stove ’Rheem Wedgewood Monterey’, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
There was a photography showing!
Emma’s showing, Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
The sadly now-closed Savoy Theater, Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Oregon street, Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10

Random bits.
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
There was a play! A delightful rendition of The Bremen Town Musicians.
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Port Orford, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/11/10
Postscript. Sunday. The Curry Public Library, 3-shot mosaic, iPhone 3G camera through windshield under relentless rain. This might be the finest iPhone pic I’ve taken.
Curry Public Library, Gold Beach, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/12/10
These Hipstamatic 185 images are too fun to leave behind!
Curry Public Library, Gold Beach, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©12/12/10
Apple iPhone 3G, Hipstamatic 185:a) Lucifer VI lens, Alfred Infared film b)Kaimal Mark II lens, Ina’s 1969 film c) John S lens, Ina’s 1969 film.

After I took these library shots, I went looking for more info about the 690 SLR used in Memento and found this nice image. Teiko’s next shot is a much cooler though similar idea to my desiccated shot.

While checking out the Kodak Pleaser pictured above, I solved a riddle in my own life, when I learned of the lawsuit that Polaroid won against Kodak. Production and sales were halted, and Kodak instant cameras were useless. Kodak offered exchanges for a new disc model in a class action settlement. Check out this short news broadcast for how it went down. My first ’photo shoot’ was with a Kodak Disc 3100 in the summer of 1989. It was a disappointing grainy mess. Apparently film labs were to use a special 6-element lens for printing, but many didn’t. Details of Kodak’s exchange program are here. Putting these bits together, I find it interesting that in late 1988, Kodak offered a disc camera in exchange, though it was already a year out of production (1987). It seems a little like ’well, we got all this disc film, and Polaroid is all pissed at us, winning lawsuits and all. This way everyone wins; but mostly us’. It could well have been the ruckus that made me aware of our disc camera for my use. It was 5 years until I used another film camera, the Kodak Cameo I’ve mentioned. Hey speaking of which, my last roll of 35mm film was scanned way back in 2006. I made a retroblog for a trip captured on it.Check it out!


I’ll be caught in the web of love so vast,
Developing so fast,
Like a Polaroid.

Bart DavenportTerri’s Song
You can see my blog featuring Bart and the rest of the Loved Ones from 2/14/2007.

Postscript
I found an unused disc cartridge film at the thrift store. It looks like this:
Unopened Kodak disc cartridge, Andrew D. Barron ©12/15/10
Also, I checked out a Kodak book from 1985 at the library and scanned a page about disc film.
Disc Film ©1985
Also in that book is an exploded view of the Kodak instant film.

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