Sunday, January 9, 2011

First Polaroids / Thomas Creek / Indian Sands

It was quite a morning with the 320. I woke up this to sunlight so I went to work to modify the camera to take two AAs and to figure out how to load the pack film. I put in the color first. I had never shot with an instant film camera. I replaced the Fuji film's plastic back with the metal one left in the 320; the metal cartridge has a stamp "1/85". Things went pretty bad and my first four shots were lost in the notorious jamming problem of this film. The metal back should have helped. So after the crushing feeling of four wasted shots with only two exposures, I got an image.
Ophir, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
But these scans do no justice to the quality of the images. They are much much better than they appear here. I scanned at 2400dpi. Even at full resolution, the detail in the actual film image is about twice as seen here. There is something odd about the mechanical rollers of the 320 itself. These problems appeared again later in the day.
Ophir, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Euchre Creek marsh.
Euchre Creek marsh, Ophir, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
In the excitement of the shots, the 320 slid in the passenger seat and crunched the shot above, making the crease down the middle.
Euchre Creek marsh, Ophir, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Barn in Ophir, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
I visited the Ophir School thrift store where the camera came from, and showed the lady the day's shots. She's a spry grandma who shoots with a Sony A55 and formerly a Nikon 35mm.

In a very short and rather expensive photo shoot I learned a few things about my 320. First off, I like it. It's a much different shooting experience and I like the focusing mechanism. I liked reconnecting with an old camera technology and a camera that is 40 years old. I blew through the remaining shots you're looking at. I like the color film, but the mechanical removal of the film needs more practice. Also, the temperature was a little cool. It seems that the 320 does better at big, near subjects, say about 30-100 feet away with interesting backgrounds.

Our crew headed down to hike at Indian Sands, stopping first at the tallest bridge in Oregon, the 345ft structure over Thomas Creek.
Thomas Creek from Thomas Creek bridge, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
It was quite cool and very windy. I held the trekpod far over the edge.
Thomas Creek bridge, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
The Pacific from Thomas Creek bridge, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
I loaded the 3000B b+w film into the 320 and figured I knew what to expect. It was not to be. It was a little cold on the point at Indian Sands. I tried a shot, pull, problem, then another. Nothing. We arrived at a great overlook that peers south towards Whaleshead. A stark dead tree made for a nice foreground subject. Bonk. The pull extracted two frames at once. Neither produced an image. I took one or two more. One left the print inside the camera. What a mess. A tangled up mess of failed exposures. Who knows what happened.

I framed the shot differently in the 320, but it was something like this:
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Indian Sands, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
House Rock overlook north of Brookings, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11
Brookings restaurant, Curry County, OR, Andrew D. Barron ©1/08/11

No comments:

Post a Comment

Search This Blog

Blog Archive