Sunday, July 31, 2011

County Fair

I don’t recall the last county fair I went to. This weekend was certainly the first since I have been a photographer. It brought back memories.
Fun Slide, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/28/11
The Pirate with Parrots guy had a scaled ship named the Nesika.
Pirate Ship, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/28/11
The Ferris Wheel was located in a different place than normal, but it was not functional.
Broken Ferris Wheel, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/28/11
Those pictures were from Thursday. I was asked to display some photographs in a building where other artists are displaying and selling their work. I didn’t think I could get anything together in time. I managed to get 17 into frames but am pretty sure that none will sell. It was good for me to select some images for 8x10 printing finally. I put them into inexpensive frames from ikea; they look good behind glass. Hanging on the standard fair “standard faire” lattice, the display looks pretty cheesy.

On Saturday I was hopeful for some interesting county fair photography.
Instax shoots parrot pirate, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
The P6000 was accidentally set to interval mode so I put it away. Here is the only P6000 shot for the day:
Parrots,, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
It was the first serious shoot with the H1 in a long time. I shot in the manual modes and tried lots of stuff, with image quality being my only minor complaint. Well, I guess I don’t know why there are not more buttons on the body to deal with stuff. There is only one dial with a push in function to select between aperture and exposure value adjustment. The iso and white balance are buried in menus too. So, as a manual camera it could be frustrating if I wasn’t so used to it.
Vendor, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
I took a number of shots prior to this one, but the light was harsh. Then as the sun began to set, things got interesting.
Jungle Gym, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
These are large waterproof bubbles in a pool of water. The attraction is like bumper cars; you get inside the bubbles and flop around.
Jungle Gym, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
A big attraction was a 4x4 dirt competition. Here is the staging area for the locals and their rigs.
Staging Area, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Chair, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Pirate ship.
Pirate ship, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Walking around in the few moments of very interesting light.
Fair fun, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Gold Beach sunset, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Then it was off to the rides are for some attempted long exposure stuff. I had the camera on a tripod and most of the time manually pushed the shutter.
Fair rides, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Fair rides, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
So far, so fun. It is a little cliché to shoot such things, but with a cruddy old 5mp camera, and an unhappy infrared dslr, it was a fun challenge. This ride consisted of a one minute lift and a sudden drop from the top. The girl was talking to her friends about how many times she had been on the ride and her all day bracelets from each day.
Fair rides, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
Then, poof! they were gone.
Fair rides, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
The ir dslr with a 35mm prime lens was not the tool for this night. I was happy with this parting shot. It seemed to me that attendance was low and a bummer for the carnies.
Fair worker conversation, Curry County Fair, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11
I put electrical tape over the flash, snapped this and headed out.
Instax shoots Ferris Wheel, Andrew D. Barron©7/30/11

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Upriver Instax

As with my first pack of FP100C, in this second pack I got one photograph I liked out of 10. This image made the reality of the light into something much more pleasing. I am going to wait for more packfilm until I get something like a Land Camera 360, or 400-series. Here goes my near mint, Land Camera 210:
Land Camera 210 and FP100C at Otter Point, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
Here is a similar image from my last blog on the same day. It more accurately captures the scene, so I like how the Land Camera made a retro cool image where things were mostly just overexposed.

July 25th was a beautiful morning. This lemon tree caught my eye as I made coffee.
Lemon tree leaf, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
We went to Agness and it was a beautiful day. I am unsure why these elements caught my eye. There was fairly harsh lighting in the mid day sun. It is more difficult to shoot nature and vistas in that type of light.
Cougar Lane, Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
Cougar Lane, Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
Cougar Lane, Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
There was a visit this year’s crop of tomatoes.
Cougar Lane, Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
I am a film waster and am certain that someday I will get the feel for the clip-on close-up filter for the Instax 210. How confusing: two instant film cameras both with the model number 210! Anyway, I am probably done with the Polaroid Land Camera for a while, so onto Fujifilm Instax 210.

My subject was too close, as always, and the leaves in focus are about twice the distance away.
Garden flowers Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
The focus area in the very shallow depth of field leaves little room for error. My guess today is about 30 inches away when using the close-up filter.

Cold, swift water is not that appealing for swimming these days. There was a time that I was king of the swimming hole; crazy high dive guy at the pool, cliff jumper at Bear Hole, bailing off 30 feet of Lovejoy Basalt into 6 feet of Chico Creek; .

I am not as spastic at the water after my sustained shoulder tweak in Kentucky in 2008. I did too many 1 1/2s into a shallow pool. After each dive entering the water, I swam backwards to apply the brakes to my fall. So, I am out of shoulders. But I am not out Fuji Instax Wide film (yet). At the edge of the Rogue River, this tranquil scene was shot in between upstream tourist jet boats that make quite a ruckus.
Instax 210: Rogue river near Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
I had an idea for a double exposure. I taped an ND+4 filter to the front, opened the back, but tilted too late and this came out; a dark picture of the water’s surface:
Rogue river near Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
Trying again: I see that I always get a big light leaks with this double exposure technique. This image isn’t bad though. It looks a lot like blackberry branches are over the water, but they were on the shore.
Instax double exposure, Rogue river near Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11
This technique works, but I am not fond of the light leaks at the edges. I am sure this would work better at night with the flash covered with tape, and of people.

At the end of the day, there were some bubbles blown. This stuff is made by Crayola. Orange bubbles. It was a little bigger than a softball as I tried to get the super sluggish P6000 to fire a shot. And it did!
Big orange bubble, Agness, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/25/11

It is cool to see GIS make the New York times; Historical Lay of the Land: viewshed of Gettysburg.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Ektra 110 / infrared fun

It was pretty bad light and wind. I put the ND+4 on the little Nikon P6000, and I was reminded of last year when I decided to go with Nikon for my first dslr purchase. (Here is the shot from last year, from a coolpix 8700.)
Leaf at Otter Point, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
The old H1 seems a better performer these days ever since I took it apart to repair the lens. It would seem this version of the H1 sensor is better.
Leaf at Otter Point, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11

North towards Hubbard Mound at Otter Point, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
Last week I picked up an Kodak Ektra 2 (a 110 camera) in perfect condition. It still had 19 shots left, so I have been taking it out. This is not really a good film format. Fun and small and very nostalgic. This one has a cool clip on flash that takes two AAAs.
Kodak Ektra 2, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
Kodak Ektra 2, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
I put the camera up to the viewfinder.
Through the Kodak Ektra 2 viewfinder, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
This is my other new acquisition. It has a very plasticky and clunky shutter feel. Still, it is my first working 35mm slr.
Nikon N50 35mm slr, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
I drove around the Old Coast Road on a dirt part that I somehow missed before. The sun was setting at the sea and the light was filtering in a just a few places.
Old Coast Road daisy and fern, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
I started to look at the images from my 13.5mp P6000. It sure seems like it is more marketing than sensor to have so many pixels. For the last few shoots, I have put the P6000 down a notch to 8mp. It looks the same to me, though performance is not noticeably improved.

Random telephoto shot yesterday with the Sony H1:
Skilsaw on stairs, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
It got to be time to show the infrared D5000 some love.
North of Wedderburn, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
Red shopping carts, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
This is probably too abstract; a late 1970’s Covette. I suppose I am to be self-conscious about the poor quality of the BOKEH! from my 35mm AF-S 1.8G lens. But while the BOKEH! isn’s the best, it is often pleasing enough.
late 1970’s Covette, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
Hunter Creek swimmers, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
It was a gray and foggy day. After the sun went down, I tried something for the first time: infrared photography with the built-in flash. The results are nice. A little spooky and Halloweenish, but interesting.
Infrared flash photography: rose, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
Infrared flash photography: leaves, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
It was pretty dark at this point.
Infrared flash photography: driftwood, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
Purple thistle in the dark.
Infrared flash photography: driftwood, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11
The flash on the camera is not that strong. The infrared results are usually unpredictable. Here is a funky parting shot of the sea at night.
Infrared flash photography: driftwood, Andrew D. Barron©7/24/11

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Instax Travels

Yreka, CA, Andrew D. Barron©7/19/11
I had previously stated that focus could never be achieved with the clip plastic close up filter. In this image, I figured something would be in focus. I was about a foot from the in-focus area.
Yreka, CA, Andrew D. Barron©7/19/11
On Tuesday morning the light was nice. Even the slightest bit of direct sunlight blacks out the Instax Wide film. I wouldn’t mind finding a way to control this a little better.
Rogue national forest madrone, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
Onward to Cave Junction, Oregon. One of these days I will make it out to visit the Oregon Caves. I imagine they are similar to the wonderful Lehman Caves in eastern Nevada.
Cave Junction quonset building, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
There is a tunnel along US199 that I often shoot, but this was the first time for the Instax. The reflector blacked out the film from the camera’s own flash at 25 miles per hour. It is a peculiar weakness of the Instax film.
Highway 199 tunnel, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
It was the longest time I have take for my trips to get to southern Oregon. I made it to Gold Beach and it was very windy. Here, the decrepit Mary D. Hume:
Mary D. Hume, Gold Beach,Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
The often photographed Patterson bridge from the northern side.
Mary D. Hume, Gold Beach,Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
The next day I went for a hike. This lovely scene was captured well on film but not so much in the scanned version. The instax was set to ‘darken’ and I held a 52mm polarizing filter up and also flashed for fill light.
Trees at trail head, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
Tree on trail, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
It is fun to travel and shoot with the Instax. Intuitive exposure adjustments seem to turn out. The focus setting is mostly useless to me since I’m not usually not shooting things up close. It is a drag to have to change the setting with each power up, but the photos still turn out if you don’t; the images just seem grainier.

It had been some time since I was on the trail. I was amazed at how many trees had fallen down. Seems like that has been a theme lately. I carried along the old sony H1. With the tele adapter on, the minimum focal length is 378mm! (35mm equivalent) and quite long. This was shot from about 15 feet away.
Tree on trail, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
There is a spot from the trail where you can see Port Orford well. It was windy and rather sunny. Not a good image by any means, but a different vantage point of the Port Orford heads I shot here (5/23/11) and here (3/8/11). The focal length of this shot is 734mm in 35mm equivalent.
Far away Port Orford heads, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
I finally standardized all of my cameras to 52mm filter attachment. For the Nikon P6000, this was a happy accident. The proper Nikon adapter (E-u21) is over $24, and has a 43mm front threads. A while back I discovered that the Lumix LX5 adapter tube fit fine, but was slightly too shallow. I figured I saved about $20 by getting the Bower brand tube for the Lumix ($13), and adding a ring from a broken filter as a spacer. (As I write this, I find there are number of after market 52mm tubes for the the P6000)
Nikon P6000 fitted with adapter tube for 52mm filters, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
Nikon P6000 fitted with adapter tube for 52mm filters, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
In mid day sun, I shot a long exposure of Hunter Creek thanks to a neutral density (+4) filter, and a polarizing filter:
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11
Here, I put on the tele adapter in front of the ND4 and polarizer. This shot is 107mm equivalent. Not great, but without the ND filter, it would not have been possible. Minor vingetting at edges is seen because I was not zoomed completely.
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11
Here is the little P6000 with 1.7x tele adapter maxed out at 160mm equivalent; it’s a far cry from the H1 at 734mm. These comparisons are not really fair though because the P6000 has a much larger sensor.
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11

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