Saturday, July 23, 2011

Instax Travels

Yreka, CA, Andrew D. Barron©7/19/11
I had previously stated that focus could never be achieved with the clip plastic close up filter. In this image, I figured something would be in focus. I was about a foot from the in-focus area.
Yreka, CA, Andrew D. Barron©7/19/11
On Tuesday morning the light was nice. Even the slightest bit of direct sunlight blacks out the Instax Wide film. I wouldn’t mind finding a way to control this a little better.
Rogue national forest madrone, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
Onward to Cave Junction, Oregon. One of these days I will make it out to visit the Oregon Caves. I imagine they are similar to the wonderful Lehman Caves in eastern Nevada.
Cave Junction quonset building, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
There is a tunnel along US199 that I often shoot, but this was the first time for the Instax. The reflector blacked out the film from the camera’s own flash at 25 miles per hour. It is a peculiar weakness of the Instax film.
Highway 199 tunnel, Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
It was the longest time I have take for my trips to get to southern Oregon. I made it to Gold Beach and it was very windy. Here, the decrepit Mary D. Hume:
Mary D. Hume, Gold Beach,Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
The often photographed Patterson bridge from the northern side.
Mary D. Hume, Gold Beach,Andrew D. Barron©7/20/11
The next day I went for a hike. This lovely scene was captured well on film but not so much in the scanned version. The instax was set to ‘darken’ and I held a 52mm polarizing filter up and also flashed for fill light.
Trees at trail head, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
Tree on trail, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
It is fun to travel and shoot with the Instax. Intuitive exposure adjustments seem to turn out. The focus setting is mostly useless to me since I’m not usually not shooting things up close. It is a drag to have to change the setting with each power up, but the photos still turn out if you don’t; the images just seem grainier.

It had been some time since I was on the trail. I was amazed at how many trees had fallen down. Seems like that has been a theme lately. I carried along the old sony H1. With the tele adapter on, the minimum focal length is 378mm! (35mm equivalent) and quite long. This was shot from about 15 feet away.
Tree on trail, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
There is a spot from the trail where you can see Port Orford well. It was windy and rather sunny. Not a good image by any means, but a different vantage point of the Port Orford heads I shot here (5/23/11) and here (3/8/11). The focal length of this shot is 734mm in 35mm equivalent.
Far away Port Orford heads, Humbug Mountain, OR, Andrew D. Barron©7/21/11
I finally standardized all of my cameras to 52mm filter attachment. For the Nikon P6000, this was a happy accident. The proper Nikon adapter (E-u21) is over $24, and has a 43mm front threads. A while back I discovered that the Lumix LX5 adapter tube fit fine, but was slightly too shallow. I figured I saved about $20 by getting the Bower brand tube for the Lumix ($13), and adding a ring from a broken filter as a spacer. (As I write this, I find there are number of after market 52mm tubes for the the P6000)
Nikon P6000 fitted with adapter tube for 52mm filters, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
Nikon P6000 fitted with adapter tube for 52mm filters, Andrew D. Barron©7/23/11
In mid day sun, I shot a long exposure of Hunter Creek thanks to a neutral density (+4) filter, and a polarizing filter:
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11
Here, I put on the tele adapter in front of the ND4 and polarizer. This shot is 107mm equivalent. Not great, but without the ND filter, it would not have been possible. Minor vingetting at edges is seen because I was not zoomed completely.
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11
Here is the little P6000 with 1.7x tele adapter maxed out at 160mm equivalent; it’s a far cry from the H1 at 734mm. These comparisons are not really fair though because the P6000 has a much larger sensor.
Hunter Creek flows by, Andrew D. Barron©7/22/11

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