Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Old leaves, old cameras

There is a machine that was once used by photogrammetrists to orthorectify aerial photography and manually draw topographic contours (or anything else). This style of contour map production is why our country has digital elevation models at 10m resolution. I hope to do an expanded post about the amazing analog PG2. These pictures are just an idea holder. The stereoplotter takes up about the space of an L comprised of two 4x6” rectangles. It is a honker; and to be fair, though I have had my frustrations with GIS people who use DEMs but have no concept of how they came to be, this is the first glimpse of a real one of these antiques. I hear there is even a geologist (and once Polaroid photographer) on staff who can get it going.
The PG2 stereoplotter, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
The PG2 stereoplotter, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
On Friday night I adventured into Portland, where I haven’t really explored. With old friends, we had a fun night, but the photos show things like:
Dral Cleaners, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
Monday, back at Vancouver after an unheard of weekend off from shooting.
Vancouver, WA leaves, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
I meant to showcase this lovely film camera I have been shooting with (besides the Konica Autoreflex T). I have pushed two rolls through, and am on the third roll. Even if none turn out, I really like this camera. It has a great feel, but very unusual f-stop and shutter speed dials.
Nikomat 35mm, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Nikomat 35mm, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
I met an old school geologist who was watching a rare Mount St. Helens documentary near my cubicle. He said he was writing a book about the filmmaker. Earlier that week, I brought in my SX-70 so I could fondle it and be inspired by it’s incredible design. I’ve yet to splurge for The Impossible Project integral film to give it a try. Anyway, the geologist said, “I haven’t seen anyone with one of those in over 10 years.” He then gestured that I could check his out. He was back before I knew it with his identical, USGS property SX-70!
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
The big yellow one had mysteriously appeared yesterday afternoon. The SX-70 is not at all suited for a through the viewfinder shot, but here it is.
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Vancouver tree, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Map makers, particularly Americans and presumably British, have a special place for a map scale of 1”:1 mile. These are distances ingrained in us, so it is a very useful scale. It is a little too small for presenting detailed mapping, but great for a good-sized area on not-too-much paper. Who knew that such a scale (a name for scaled rulers) was ever made!
63,360, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
It is kind of funny though, because a RULER is this scale. Um, One inch is one mile; no conversion needed. He he. 63,360 multiplied by the repeating decimal 13.6363636363. . . . [13&21/33rds] is the width of the solar disc in miles.
Vancouver, WA leaves, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11

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