Sunday, November 6, 2011

Sunday, Sunny Sunday


I wanted to do a building blog in Vancouver and/or Portland. I was thinking along the lines of a building I shot in Owensboro, KY, December ‘07. The 120 room Sun Hotel was built in 1963, and apparently can be yours for $2M. Located at 1926 Triplett, Owensboro, it is also referred to as Gabe’s Tower after Gabe Fiorella, and the Regency Tower. Below are a few pictures from that old blog I reprocessed tonight. It was a random history book tipped me back then; straight out of the Jetsons! Above are three different tourist postcards. Read more about the building here, and the continuing saga here. What you won’t find is the name of the architect, though I believe it was built by a man named Sy Clark.
1963 Gabe's Tower, Owensboro, KY, Andrew D. Barron©12/14/07
1963 Gabe's Tower, Owensboro, KY, Andrew D. Barron©12/14/07
1963 Gabe's Tower, Owensboro, KY, Andrew D. Barron©12/14/07
I looked up “Notable architecture, Vancouver, WA” last night and was surprised to see a very similar building is the tallest in Vancouver, the Smith Tower built in 1965. So I went out a shooting, and there was unexpected sunshine.
Smith tower, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
Vancouver beauty school, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
This big bird flew down and caught my attention. I parked and watched it for a while.
Big bird, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
I wandered around and there I was at the train station.
BNSF line, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
I went to the end of the sidewalk at the station as a train approached. It was just like the sound so familiar to any CalTrain rider. I barely stepped back for the commuter train to pull up. The next two photos are out of sequence, but fit together better.
Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
Train bridge over the Columbia, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
The sun began to shine and I made my way towards Portland. It is fitting in a sense, because much of my time has been spent digitizing a map by Jim Smith, the 1993 I-2005 map, released at 1:500,000, but compiled (and eventually redigitized) at 1:250,000.

Here are a few more shots of the unrelated Smith Tower.
Smith tower, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
Smith tower, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
I-5 south to Portland.
I5 south over the Columbia, Vancouver, WA, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
There is a neat dock on the northern end. It is called something like McCulley’s port.
Port at Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
Duck duck duck. Ducky duck duck. Ducky ducky ducky ducky ducky duck. Da da duck duck duck.
Duck on the Columbia, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
That was a reference to a wacky Saturday Night Live skit, Lorne and Tom In A Tub with Tom Greene (Season 26, ep.6, 2000).
Port at Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
It was a stroke of luck to be sunny and for it to be right overhead at noon.
Port at Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
I found some neat parts of town. Here I am at the Portland Nursery. (overview.
Portland nursery, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
This building caught my eye too, NE41st and NE Hancock.
Hollywood district building, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11
Random sign, neat building, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11

Moonrise over Hollywood theater, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©11/6/11

2 comments:

  1. So glad you are still behind the lens!

    ReplyDelete
  2. The architect of Gabe's Tower, in Owensboro, Ky., is R. Ben Johnson (1921-2009). There is an obit for Johnson at http://bit.ly/La3ieT

    The late Sy Clark, whom you mention, was the owner of Owensboro-based Clark Construction, which was the general contractor for the tower.

    I am the creator of the Save Gabe's page on Facebook, which almost certainly is the most comprehensive one-stop online source of information about Gabe's Tower --- including a "Gabe's" album of some 50 Gabe's-related photographs and images.

    See https://www.facebook.com/SaveGabes


    Many thanks,

    JOHN LUMEA

    ReplyDelete

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