Thursday, March 29, 2012

Down and Up

Sunset reflections on the marsh
Sunset on the marsh, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
On Sunday, when I recorded the Leica video, I had a rather awesome day shooting around Port Orford. Down at the Heads looking to the south:
Bay at Port Orford Heads, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12
Cyclone fence, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12
(why does it have to be called) Pussy willow, Garrison lake, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12
I look forward to seeing this on 35mm film!
Surface, Garrison lake, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12
Instax wide:
Surface, Garrison lake, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12

Reeds, Garrison lake, Andrew D. Barron©3/25/12
On Tuesday night, the storm broke for a moment and painted orange all around.
Intense last light of day, Andrew D. Barron©3/27/12
Pillars of destruction: storm underway, Andrew D. Barron©3/28/12
Closed due to high water, Andrew D. Barron©3/27/12

Earl

Spring 1998. Early in my time in the Silicon Valley, I was invited to see a show. I had a connection to folks at the AMES research center. It was a bluegrass band that was playing at barbecue joint in San Jose. Sam’s BBQ. My friend’s dad was the bass player in the band, and was indeed, a rocket scientist.

After their set, my first exposure to an actual bluegrass ensemble, I approached the banjo player. He knew the look I must’ve had. He said, “you want to play the banjo! Get yourself a copy of Flatt and Scruggs Foggy Mountain Banjo.” I ordered it right away.

It was a great start in my bluegrass education. Rest well Mr. Scruggs, and thank you.


Due to the rarity and price of that particular CD, I would instead recommend picking up one of the comprehensive chronological collections produced by Bear Family Records.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Video Moment

with the Leica IIIf at Port Orford Heads.

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Go Shoot

Just a little reminder to myself to get out and shoot. I really need a decent film scanner. Not having one is a little tactical misjudgment as I drifted into film photography. Anyway, these are some digital shots from the last two days.
Landslide at Woodroof Creek, US 101, Andrew D. Barron©3/23/12
Ocean Way, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
Ruby.
Ruby, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Pine, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Oak, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Rust, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Bees, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Rust, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Later, the Fujifilm Instax 210 for the drop.
Euchre creek marsh, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
Euchre creek marsh, Andrew D. Barron©3/24/12
I loaded the Leica IIIf with some Ektar 100 to see how that camera does with color. If it is prone to flare as I have read about, I will know when this roll gets back.

Thursday, March 22, 2012

High Water Everywhere

Wednesday.
High Water, US 101, Andrew D. Barron©3/21/12
Storm's a brewin', Andrew D. Barron©3/21/12
It rained for a steady 36 hours. Thursday:
Euchre Creek bridge, Ophir, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
Euchre Creek, Ophir, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
High Water, US 101, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
I keep hoping to witness Greggs Creek to break through to the sea more directly, but it was not today. It got within tens of feet in this storm(two instant film shots together):
High water Greggs Creek, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
Bridge over the Rogue River.
Patterson Bridge over the Rogue, Andrew D. Barron©3/22/12
Blog title from a great Charlie Patton song.

Saturday, March 17, 2012

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Julian Rocks

15 years ago this March, my friend Doc Russell and I visited an historically significant secluded place called Julian Rocks, up Stony Creek in western Glenn County, California. I recently found those 35mm negatives, so here they are! The Kodak Cameo Zoom was holiday gift in late 1994. The camera was a pretty decent performer considering how easy it was to use.
Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
With Doc Russell at Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
Julian Rocks was a favorite swimming hole in years gone by before flood control structures and ownership made the location inaccessible. We wrote an article for the local history publication called Wagon Wheels Vol.48 No.2, 1998. I found out later that one of these photographs ended up in a later work by Doc Russell, The Land of Orland, appearing on p.112, viewable here. In 1998 I put up this page, now modified to include these better scans.
Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
Julian Rocks on Stony Creek, Glenn County, CA, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997
With a picture of me from the same roll, I am pointing to Julian Rocks. Not long after this, I ended up working at the USGS in Menlo Park.
Andrew points to Julian Rocks on the map, Andrew D. Barron©3/1997

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Friday, March 9, 2012

Instax Fun

I went out to Otter Point yesterday.
From Otter Point looking west-northwest, Andrew D. Barron©3/8/12
These next three are with the infrared-converted Nikon. This was probably a safety fence concrete footing.
Concrete and chain links, Andrew D. Barron©3/8/12
Vibrant green shore pines, lost in the wide aperture of the f1.8 lens and 715nm.
Shore pines in infrared, Andrew D. Barron©3/8/12
I am sort of dazed and confused. In July 2010, I had no experience with an SLR nor manual photography. Now, I’m shooting, wait, what, a Leica IIIf and a Hasselblad 500c? It’s been super fun.
Leica IIIf and Hasselblad 500c, Andrew D. Barron©3/8/12
These cameras are something a lot like perfection in mechanical devices. So my adventures have become a lot more about taking photographs and a little less suited for blogging. As you may have noticed, I have not been able to share the multitude of 35mm and 120 film shots yet. There are around 20 rolls sitting here until I get around to scanning them. The Leica may have a slightly damaged shutter curtain, so I will probably have to send if off for some work.

The experimentalist I am got the better of me today though. I figured it should possible to load a sheet of Instax Wide into an ancient Kodak Autographic Junior. With my arms buried in the film changing bag, I am pretty sure I did everything right. I’ll spare you the suspense: in two tries, I got nothing. Luckily, I only ruined one additional print from the Instax pack. It was fun to try. The process is completely tedious but would be worth trying again with a better camera. I expected success and photographed the process.
Kodak Autographic Junior loaded with instax wide, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
Kodak Autographic Junior loaded with instax wide, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
I love this old house and thanks to the time loading-unloading-reloading Instax film, the light changed in interesting ways. Here I grabbed a straight frame with my crappy old point and shoot. Actually, it was the big bird flying above that caused this snap.
Euchre Creek home, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
The infrared D5000:
Euchre Creek home, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
In a bright sun moment, I shot the Instax 210.
Euchre Creek home, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
Just as a reminder, my first shoot with the Instax 210 was a month and a year ago. Here’s what I got that first night, when I wrote:
The valley, slowly carved by Euchre Creek, embraced the falling rays of light. With a bored yawn, the sun painted over man’s industry affectionately.
The Old, Old House, Euchre Creek Road, Andrew D. Barron ©1/19/11
I probably won’t be bothered to try the instax film swap again soon. The biggest hassle is reloading it and ejecting it through the back of the Instax 210. In this experiment I got blank white prints; the possible problems are too numerous to track down. Besides, the Instax 210 does what it does, and I am glad to have a choice with integral instant film. So here are some shots with the Instax Wide at the end of the day.
Euchre Creek home, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12
Sisters Rocks to the north from Ophir, Andrew D. Barron©3/9/12

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