Sunday, December 23, 2012

Mine Visit

Tonight I discovered one of my blogs had a bunch of dead links. I am sure there are many, but that one was a pretty good one. I had aspirations for photography a few years back that are so much different than now. I am a self-taught photographer with a completely random trajectory. When I had more time, I found that filling up the days with photography followed by an evening on the computer making these blogs carried a sense of worth for my time. Feel free to review the 2010 black and white blog here.

Hellbound Glory has been playing less often, but there is a tour opening for Kid Rock’s stadium tour beginning in February. We are also playing on the 25th and New Year’s Eve at the Crystal Bay club.

I think my point is that being off that very random existence with the band has helped straighten out my random existence as a photographer. Also, things at work have been good. I put together a new computer going with the highest-end Mac Mini and loading it with a bunch of ram and another hard drive. I was more into the form factor than the horsepower. There was a lot to learn, and I have a ludicrous legacy of computer files to deal with. But now I have a dedicated work computer (actually replaces the Vaio FE590 that died in May; see entry). Of course I immediately plugged in my scanner and set to work dealing with the Hasselblad negatives you have been seeing on this blog lately. Well, now that I’ve said it, here are two from 12/24/2011 at one of my favorite places yet found in the universe, Sisters Rocks, a few miles north of Ophir in Curry County, Oregon.
Frankport, on the south side of Sisters Rocks, Andrew D. Barron©12/15/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, Zeiss 80mm ƒ2.8, TriX]
Frankport, on the south side of Sisters Rocks, Andrew D. Barron©12/15/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, distagon 50mm ƒ4, Ektar 100]
When I broke out the Hasselblad a couple of weeks ago I could not remember what film was in there, and I had this idea for a night shot. Because it seems like if I am awake and not in a chair it is dark. Turned out the film was asa100 not asa400. Still, I think this ‘corporate goodnight’ came out as planned:
Frozen night outside a Gateway complex, Andrew D. Barron©12/15/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, distagon 50mm ƒ4, Ektar 100]

Joseph invited me out for a quick mine tour on Friday, my first chance to be on site where I have been making maps since April. I went with a geologist/beekeeper who had spent enough time in that part of Nevada to take us to some interesting historic sites, too. The unstated goal was to capture some 120 film negatives of the mine site that were suitable for enlargements and framing in our corporate office. I don’t know if I have ever found my groove with the Hasselblad, but I accepted the challenge.

It was also great to drop of and pick up the film on the same day reviewing scans from my photoshoot only 24 hours after exposing the film. I will say that I should not have cheaped out with my scanner, because I have trouble getting colors right with the Epson V500. It could also be my distrust of any kind of automatic settings. They do however, tend to look better, but I just want to learn why that is before I accept it.

I find the 4S a very capable camera and all of my time with the 3G camera has helped me a lot. So though it may be better to stage this blog in a more coherent single entry, I almost never do that, so why would I now?
Crossroads, Pershing county, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [iphone 4S, PRO 645]
On site, Hycroft Mine, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [iphone 4S, PRO 645]
On site, Hycroft Mine, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [iphone 4S, PRO 645]
On site, Hycroft Mine, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [iphone 4S, PRO 645]
Now on with the few Hasselblad shots so far. I am having a real tough time with the colors when scanning. It isn’t always clear what is real, if you catch my drift. I wish things were easier, but I really wonder how optical printing color balancing worked. And further, how difficult would be to actually make my own photographic prints? Too hard I am sure.
Sulphur Nevada rooftop, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, Zeiss 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
We went to another locale. This place had been lived in as recently as the 1980’s they said.
Miner’s quarters, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, Zeiss 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
We went to a locale called the Spires and I hope those negatives turned out. Only after all of this time can I say: the 50mm Zeiss Distagon ƒ4 is (much?) less sharp than the 80mm Zeiss Planar. So I will keep that in mind for the future. We stopped at an old stamp mill, but the temperature was dropping fast. I broke a bunch fingernails getting into the Pelican case (a new hazard for me now that the irreplaceable camera is adequately protected). Anyway, I shot without a meter because I couldn’t find it. It was in the truck all along, but I got another look at the neat Spires, since I lamely made us go back for a look for the not-lost, but similarly irreplaceable Luna ProF. Here is an iphone shot of the stamp mill:
Crossroads, Pershing county, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [iphone 4S, PRO 645]

Joseph kept saying to let him know if there was any shot he needed to stop for. At the end of the day, this was the only time I said STOP!
On the way home, Andrew D. Barron©12/21/12 [Hasselblad 500c/m, distagon 50mm ƒ4, Ektar 100]

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