Monday, December 31, 2012

Scanning scanning

North side waves, Sisters Rocks, Andrew D. Barron©12/24/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Ektar 100]
I'm plugging away at sorting out my old negatives and how to scan them. Here are some from a roll of Portra 400 and Ektar 100 from late December 2011. I am getting better results from using ColorPerfect, but there is still room for improvement. I have been leaving on the entire frame boundary. I have accepted the impermanence of all of this. The negatives will last for a hundred years or more, who knows what technology may emerge in the future. The sideways “V V” on the far left side lets the photogeeks know that it is a Hasselblad. Some photographers prefer to show their edges, and I guess I am one of them; I can’t remember the last time I cropped on image on this blog different than how I shot it.

My last photograph in Vancouver:
Leaving Vancouver, Andrew D. Barron©12/22/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
After the day photographing waves crash at Sisters Rocks (several of those have appeared already), I was eager to try a trail south of Gold Beach across from 80 Acres Road. That day was really good for photography. I am always excited to go shoot when I get to Gold Beach. Refer to last year’s digital infrared and other digital shots in this entry.
Forest on the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
Once down on the beach, I remember having this idea that Portra might pull out some subtleties of the rocks.
The beach at the end of the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
Here is the same shot with an iphone 3G:
Unnamed creek at Section 24 beach, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11
This beach is definitely a hidden gem. I recall my excitement for both the locale and the Hasselblad, and as such, these next two frames look like a comparison of the 50mm ƒ4 distagon and the 150mm ƒ4 (seen here). So the 50mm:
The beach at the end of the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
And the 150mm: (maybe)
The beach at the end of the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
Here are a few Ektar frames:
Beach driftwood, end of the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Ektar 100]
Beach driftwood, end of the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Ektar 100]
Back up the trail. I had higher hopes for this image, but there is a lot of fine detail in the negative, but was underexposed, making it grainy, and overall, just pretty average:
Back up the 333 trail, Andrew D. Barron©12/26/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Ektar 100]

This roll kept going as I traveled around to places I had shot a lot in Curry county. This last frame look up a flooded Lobster Creek near the bridge up the Rogue. One thing I learn lately is that I let the newness of shooting film get in the way of shooting beautiful scenes. Often I see an accuracy in the film photographs, but not dramatically more. I still carry a bias that has not proven consistent: just because it is on film won’t make it an extraordinary photograph.
Lobster Creek,from North Bank road, Andrew D. Barron©12/30/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Portra 400]
This is one of my favorite places: the edge at Otter Point. 50mm distagon ƒ4:
South: the edge at Otter Point, Andrew D. Barron©12/31/11 [Hasselblad 500c/m, 80mm ƒ2.8, Ektar 100]
Happy new year!

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