Saturday, January 5, 2013

Hassy lens on the infrared Nikon

I tried to get a conversion ring to use Leica lenses on the Nikon, but it did’t work. But for $70, I can mount the Hassy lenses when I want to try something different. The adapter ring has a tripod mount. I am sure photodiox makes adapters for other camera mounts; this is the Nikon F mount one.
Hassy lens on Nikon DX camera, Andrew D. Barron©1/5/13 [645 PRO for 4S]
Hassy lens on Nikon DX camera, Andrew D. Barron©1/5/13 [645 PRO for 4S]
I didn’t take a lot time to test this out fully. The 80mm lens is a lot longer than I am used to on the infrared camera; it translates to a 120mm focal length. So below represent a few minutes with LiveView manual focusing and manual exposure.
Geothermal, Andrew D. Barron©1/5/13 [Infrared converted D5000 w/Zeiss 80mm planar for Hasselblad]
Juniper berries, Andrew D. Barron©1/5/13 [Infrared converted D5000 w/Zeiss 80mm planar for Hasselblad]
Small sage in the snow, Andrew D. Barron©1/5/13 [Infrared converted D5000 w/Zeiss 80mm planar for Hasselblad]
The best part so far is there is no infrared hot spot. The cheap 35mm Nikon ƒ1.8 lens that is so awesome for normal photography does have a hot spot at most apertures smaller than ~ƒ5.6. I think that lens will be headed to craigslist, or I may wait for a killer deal on an old D90. Nikon must’ve really done it right with the D90; used prices have not dropped despite the introduction of loads of other bodies with better sensors. I also finally realized that the 50m ƒ1.4 Nikkor lens from my Nikomat FT2 mounts fine onto the D5000 body.

For both the Hassy lens and the old Nikkor, aperture control is on the lens, and shutter speed in the camera. There is a way to meter in something called stopped-down mode, but I don’t yet know how to do that. I just used test shots to get the expsoures.

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