Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Reno Weekday


A few weeks back, I was testing the A12 back that I had put new light seals in. That seems to have turned out fine. I have two backs for the Hasselblad, and so, the manual 12 back I loaded with Portra 400. I often think I can get away with really low light with that film and the ƒ2.8 lens. Here I propped the camera up on the floor and set the shutter speed to 1/15”. Cary Safe Co., Buffalo, NY
Safe at Big Eds, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©January 2013 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 80mm ƒ2.8, Kodak Portra 400 frame 1]
Lately Garry Winogrand comes to mind, quoted variously:

I photograph to find out what something will look like photographed.

I photograph what interests me all the time. I live with the pictures to see what that thing looks like photographed.

Photography is not about the thing photographed. It is about how that thing looks photographed.


A good clip with Garry is from Bill Moyers’ Creativity, see here, two years before Winogrand’s passing in 1984. If you’re curious, you can check out more about his last Leica M4 here.

Perhaps that is why I am shooting heavy equipment. In this composition, I was after a jawa-transport-vibe here (aka the Sandcrawler from Star Wars).
Excavator 330 and the rising moon.
The excavator and rising moon, south Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/23/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 120mm ƒ5.6, Kodak Portra 400 frame 4]
I seem to be bringing in the moon back into my photography. It has been absent for years now.

One night working late, I think scanning in negatives for my last entry, I headed out, glad to find that Jimboy’s tacos was open at 11pm. I pulled in there and saw a photo. After paying, I backed up for this shot. It is actually two frames where I focused close and far, both handheld with the 120mm ƒ5.6 lens. I hope that you are unable to see my edit. Most of what looks crappy here is banding from jpg compression. This was shot figuring that I could get away with 1/30” exposure wide open at ƒ5.6. The tacos were good.
The moon above Jimboy’s, midtown Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/24/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 120mm ƒ5.6, Kodak Portra 400 frame 5]
Again with the backhoe. . .
Parking lot backhoe, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/24/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 80mm ƒ2.8, Kodak Portra 400 frame 7]
On Friday, I was only headed out for lunch, but then stayed out shooting all afternoon; an urban adventure in Reno. It is surprising what can appear when I consciously shift to random observer. I’ll get to that.
Switching to Fuji Reala.

Hasselblad on Fourth Street, Reno. Add two frames when finished
Farris Apartments, 4th street Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 120mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 2]
So I was headed back to the office and across the highway, where I have driven by countless times, something registered in my periphery. Driving around in traffic sucks, but driving around when you don’t really know or care where you are going is more fun. So, anyway, take a look!
Mini Golf Moai, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 120mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 4]
This thing is quite cool, but hard to photograph from outside the fence. I passed the camera over the bars and held it sideways for this one:
Mini Golf Moai, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 120mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 5]
I was getting close to finishing up two rolls of 120, and was near the place where I get my film processed. So I moseyed on over to Gordon’s to waste the remaining frames. While there, I tested out a used 250mm ƒ5.6 Zeiss lens. The closest focusing on this super long silver lens is just under eight feet. Check it out:
Sycamore, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 250mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 10]
Sycamore, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 250mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 11]
Gordon’s Photo Service, Reno, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/25/13 [Hasselblad 500c/m; Planar 250mm ƒ5.6, Fuji Reala 100 frame 4]
The folks there processed my film while I waited, which was unexpected and awesome. I had a long conversation with another customer, a woman in her 90’s who was getting some enlargements made of photos from her childhood. We talked about Kodak folders, her first camera, and then Brownie box cameras. She shook her head as she admitted to shooting 110 film for more than twenty years, knowing how poorly they enlarged. I assured her that she wasn’t alone, and that 110 was still around.

A later edit of this blog will include a few more shots. With my short cable release and the long 120mm lens, I sat in front of the camera. Click here to see.

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