Sunday, February 3, 2013

A roll from the Leica

Contrails over the house, Reno NV, Andrew D. Barron©October 2012 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
I didn’t remember that my Leica was loaded with film. The early part of the roll had some shots from when we tracked the album in late September. At some point, I showed other people the quietness of the IIIf’s shutter. So when I went to load it this year and there was film in there, I was bummed. But like I said I distinctly remembered about six or seven blank frames prior to opening the bottom, so I was pretty sure that the real exposures on there were rolled up and safe. I finished it out the roll with mostly junk shots, as it turns out. After so much work with 120 film lately, it is hard to go back to these 35mm images. So here is the very incoherent bunch of negatives I scanned tonight. It is also problematic that the sprocket holes seem to intrude into the image space.

One of the reasons I purchased ColorPerfect was to deal with the greenish tint I was getting from Portra 400. The results on 35mm are very comparable to the stock, EpsonScan software. But since it does seem to work a lot better with 120 film scans, I have no regrets (but still greenish Portra 400 in 35mm).
Sycamore leaves, Reno NV, Andrew D. Barron©October 2012 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
I don’t recall shooting this camera upside-down. The composition is stronger and geometry is more pronounced as is.
Cafe De Thai, Reno NV, Andrew D. Barron©October 2012 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
For the first time with 35mm I am leaving some of the film edges. I wish the 120 DIGITALIZA scanning mask worked as well for this as the 35mm one. This shot was definitely supposed to be in focus. With the rangefinder, it happens occasionally to forget to focus, or to forget to remove the lens cap, etc., because the viewfinder is not the picture-taking lens. This is the film camera museum shelf at Gordon’s Photo Supply and their supply of film. I can make out the 4x5 boxes, the Instax films, Ektar, and Tri-x. The white boxes are Ilford emulsions. I like to say emulsions nowadays instead of film because it connotes a variation in the actual film, and further separates the word film from motion/video capture. It often seems to people that film is something you do to create movies. Got it. . okay, emulsions. . .
Film at Gordon’s, Reno NV, Andrew D. Barron©January 2013 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
I really wanted this night shot with the crescent moon to be more interesting. If any, the last frame would look the best at full size.
Crescent moon outside of mexican restaurant, south Reno NV, Andrew D. Barron©January 2013 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
Like I said, I have become very spoiled using the 60x60mm negative from the Hasselblad, compared to these 24x36mm negs. Here is a shot from my friend’s band, with Jim (far right) and Chad (far left). As everyone knows, it is hard to shoot 400 speed film in a dark bar. If I were to go for a band photography at night thing, I would try to push Portra two stops to iso1600. Or push TriX to 3200. But here, this shot is only successful to frame all four members at once.
Wildhorse Drive at the Red Dog, Virginia City, NV, Andrew D. Barron©1/18/13 [Leica IIIf, Sumitar 50mm ƒ2.0, Portra 400]
It is so hard to believe how much time is consumed dealing with film scans, scan to blog post was four hours.

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