Monday, October 16, 2000

Unplanned trip to Nashville!

Shot with WLA's 2.1mp Olympus C-2000Z

Saturday, October 14.
Andrew D. Barron on the Music Highway. The sign came up fast, the photos do get better!Our field work finished a few days early, but I kept my scheduled flight. I dropped off John at the Memphis airport and headed 220 miles east for two days in Nashville. What a lucky opportunity!

I felt my way through the city and at dusk found the great
Chicago Style Gyros at 346 Harding Place. The gyros were the best and there was a motel across the street. Two birds, one stone. I opened the events section in the paper and discovered that Guy Clark was playing at the Douglas Corner Cafe.

Gasp. Guy's 1997 live album Keepers, opens with a man saying,
"The Douglas Corner Cafe proudly presents Sugar Hill Recording artist Guy Clark!"

This would have been a lucky night no matter what, but as it was…

it had been a year since I had finished up my website for Guy. It was a incredible show. Suzi Ragsdale, Verlon Thompson, Darrell Scott and Kenny Malone were in the band. It was like the Keepers album all over again. I stood in amazement at the bar, next to John Prine! In between songs I eavesdropped over his conversation about his cancer treatments. It was a very intense experience, especially considering that I had no plans to visit Nashville at all. I thanked John Baldwin in my head and felt like the luckiest guy. John Prine was one of my earliest 'favorite' songwriters and I thanked him for his work with a handshake.

I drove around Nashville on Sunday and went to a few record shops. I was elated to finally find Albert Lee's out of print album Hiding, which featured the famous Country Boy, introduced to me in 1992 on his StarLicks video. Then I found few Steven Fromholz records and a rare 'for DJs' CD of a Lyle Lovett interview intended for radio play introducing his tribute album Step Inside This House. The prerelease of that album, by my favorite songwriter, in tribute to his favorite songwriters, was a wonderful springboard into Texas songwriters. Townes Van Zandt, Guy Clark and Eric Taylor became integral to my ears, ever since that fateful fall of 1998.

Photography was an afterthought. In a daze from the remarkable serendipity all weekend, I arrived at the Country Music Hall of fame in the early afternoon on Monday.
Andrew D. Barron, Country Music Hall of Fame, October 2000
Bluegrass! Andrew D. Barron visits the Country Music Hall of Fame, 2000
Andrew D. Barron photographs Bill Monroe's hall of fame plaqueAndrew D. Barron photographs Bill Monroe's mandolin used on My Last Days on Earth
Merle Haggard plaque and Raeanne Rubenstein's intriguing portrait of Emmylou Harris.
Andrew D. Barron photographs Merle Haggard's hall of fame plaqueRaeanne Rubenstein's portrait of Emmylou Harris
Andrew D. Barron photographs Emmylou Harris and Gram Parsons plauqe, Nashville Walk of Fame, October 2000

A couple of guitar greats...
Andrew D. Barron photographs Don Rich plaque, Nashville Walk of Fame, October 2000
Andrew D. Barron photographs Luther Perkins plaque, Nashville Walk of Fame, October 2000
Andrew D. Barron photographs Johnny Cash and June Carter plaques, Nashville Walk of Fame, October 2000
Nashville Skyline...complete with restaurant sign.
Andrew D. Barron, Nashville Skyline, October 2000
And it's over. There's someone special waiting for me tomorrow at the airport. I can't wait to tell her of my adventures!
Andrew D. Barron on the Music Highway. Back to Memphis, back to California. What a trip!

Saturday, October 14, 2000

Trenching the Farrenburg Lineament

Shot with WLA's 2.1mp Olympus C-2000Z

Monday, October 2. We had a two week field schedule.

John Baldwin and I (and a 90 pound bag of surveying gear) traveled to New Madrid, Missouri to investigate a geomorphic feature near Farrenburg. It was my second trip with John for this type of work on Sikeston Ridge. I rented a guitar from a Memphis music store.

Cotton field, looking west towards our home.
Cotton field sunset, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Several days had passed. We opened and flagged two trenches. We arrived during harvest this year. The John Deere's proximity to our trench and the Topcon Total Station was unnerving.
Cotton picker, Topcon total station,  New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We were surveying when a blimp appeared. It was a strange sight. Got the prism too.
Blimp while surveying, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Once we surveyed our flagging we began logging our interpretation. John Baldwin takes a closer look.
John Baldwin, geologist, taking a closer look
Here's the trench, flagging, and the Intrepid.
Southern Farrenburg trench, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We had a penchant for RedMan in the field. I have a penchant for goofy poses (and Prism Kites. Cotton ball.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, cotton picker, Prism kite fan
Roy Van Arsdale, Sue Cashman, and John Baldwin review the exposure. Days later, John snapped me in the trench.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, works in the trench
We became friends with Lynn and ____ working on their land the year before. They invited us for dinner and a party. A young friend of the family offered to take me up to photograph our site.
Andrew D. Barron flies over New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Mississippi River, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Looking over our northern trench.

Here is the Farrenburg lineament, looking south towards the Mississippi. Our trenches are in the middle.
Farrenburg lineament, New Madrid Missouri, October 2000
We had finished logging, had a trench review. We tentatively concluded that our lineament was an impressive sand blow, likely formed during the 1811-1812 earthquakes.
Trench, Farrenburg lineament, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
October 14, 2000. Our work at the site was finished. We hired Larry Hamilton to excavate and close our trenches. The Mayor of nearby Lilbourn, Larry was a lot of fun to work with.
Larry Hamilton, Hamilton Plumbing, Lilbourn, Missouri, October 2000
Larry gave us a few lessons on the backhoe; here's John.
John Baldwin backfills Farrenburg trench, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
We did a half a day of reconnaissance along the Commerce Geophysical Lineament.
Andrew D. Barron, geomorphologist, investigates some fine sands
One night we enjoyed sunset on the Mississippi river.

John rebooked his flight and was headed home early. I kept the car and began thinking of a Nashille adventure. I shot a few photos of our home away from home in New Madrid, used by CERI staff installing the GPS network in the region.
Cricket guest, CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
Smelled funny in there. Great decor, too. We liked this house.
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
CERI house, New Madrid, Missouri, October 2000
And down the road I go.
Headed to Memphis from New Madrid, October, 2000

Search This Blog

Blog Archive