Sunday, October 30, 2011

Fall in Camas

Fall is underway here in southern Washington. It is often hard in cities to even catch the sunset. On Wednesday, there was some great light in Camas as I explored.
Nevada street, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
The Georgia Pacific paper mill dominates the western skyline.
Camas skyline, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Old building, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Sidewalk view, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Wild vegetables, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Old building, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Old building, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Sun sets down the tracks.
Sun sets down the tracks, BNSF line, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
Train station, BNSF Line, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/27/11
On Saturday morning, there was unexpected sunshine and the light was great in downtown Camas.
Old building, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/29/11
Sidewalk, Camas, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/29/11
Tree at the Camas library, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/29/11
Tree at the Camas library, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/29/11
Tree at the Camas library, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/29/11
It is raining steady this Sunday morning. Yesterday afternoon, I took a trip over to Portland’ Hollywood district. I found my style of photography at odds with the pace and space allotted in urban Portland. But the light was great, even if I could barely get a shot out before I was in someone’s (in a much bigger hurry than me) way. Cities can be like that.

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Marble Mountain

I had the pleasure in assisting with the installation of two 40watt solar panels charging three deep cycle batteries. It is a repeater amplifier for radio communications monitoring the volcano. There was active logging happening as we drove up the road to Marble Mountain.
Ground cover, Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
It is getting to be that time of year, and it was still freezing this morning. In places, the frost didn’t thaw all day.
Frozen fox glove, Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Solar panels, Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
An older installation had bank of humongous 2v batteries at 750ah. Each is almost more than one person can lift.
750ah 2v batteries, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
From the site, three volcanoes are visible. Mount St. Helens to the north:
Mount St. Helens from Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Mount Rainier.
Mount Rainier from Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Mount Adams.
Mount Adams from Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Later in the day, I set the big batteries in view of Mount Adams.
Mount Adams and batteries, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
And a wider shot of Mount Rainier to the northeast.
Mount Rainier from Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Here the solar panels are getting their final installation.
Solar panel installation, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
I scrambled through some bushes trying to get a good shot of Mount St. Helens. After it was all done, the view from the installation site was best.
Mount St. Helens from Marble Mountain, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
Late in the day the light was great. Here is a tree cutting machine on the way down the from the mountain. Think circular saw blade, but 5 feet in diameter!
Tree feller, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11
The southern slopes of Mount St. Helens approaching sunset.
southern slopes of Mount St. Helens, Andrew D. Barron©10/25/11

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Old leaves, old cameras

There is a machine that was once used by photogrammetrists to orthorectify aerial photography and manually draw topographic contours (or anything else). This style of contour map production is why our country has digital elevation models at 10m resolution. I hope to do an expanded post about the amazing analog PG2. These pictures are just an idea holder. The stereoplotter takes up about the space of an L comprised of two 4x6” rectangles. It is a honker; and to be fair, though I have had my frustrations with GIS people who use DEMs but have no concept of how they came to be, this is the first glimpse of a real one of these antiques. I hear there is even a geologist (and once Polaroid photographer) on staff who can get it going.
The PG2 stereoplotter, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
The PG2 stereoplotter, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
On Friday night I adventured into Portland, where I haven’t really explored. With old friends, we had a fun night, but the photos show things like:
Dral Cleaners, Portland, OR, Andrew D. Barron©10/21/11
Monday, back at Vancouver after an unheard of weekend off from shooting.
Vancouver, WA leaves, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
I meant to showcase this lovely film camera I have been shooting with (besides the Konica Autoreflex T). I have pushed two rolls through, and am on the third roll. Even if none turn out, I really like this camera. It has a great feel, but very unusual f-stop and shutter speed dials.
Nikomat 35mm, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Nikomat 35mm, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
I met an old school geologist who was watching a rare Mount St. Helens documentary near my cubicle. He said he was writing a book about the filmmaker. Earlier that week, I brought in my SX-70 so I could fondle it and be inspired by it’s incredible design. I’ve yet to splurge for The Impossible Project integral film to give it a try. Anyway, the geologist said, “I haven’t seen anyone with one of those in over 10 years.” He then gestured that I could check his out. He was back before I knew it with his identical, USGS property SX-70!
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
The big yellow one had mysteriously appeared yesterday afternoon. The SX-70 is not at all suited for a through the viewfinder shot, but here it is.
Richard Waitt's well used SX-70, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Vancouver tree, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
Map makers, particularly Americans and presumably British, have a special place for a map scale of 1”:1 mile. These are distances ingrained in us, so it is a very useful scale. It is a little too small for presenting detailed mapping, but great for a good-sized area on not-too-much paper. Who knew that such a scale (a name for scaled rulers) was ever made!
63,360, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11
It is kind of funny though, because a RULER is this scale. Um, One inch is one mile; no conversion needed. He he. 63,360 multiplied by the repeating decimal 13.6363636363. . . . [13&21/33rds] is the width of the solar disc in miles.
Vancouver, WA leaves, Andrew D. Barron©10/24/11

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Mount St. Helens

I tried to make it to the Johnston Ridge Observatory by sunrise. But I was only moments late. The wind was brutal, cold, and laced with a biting dust anyway. So, after a few hours, I pointed over the edge and shot this and ran back in for cover.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
I watched the movie and behind the screen before the presentation there is a red curtain.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
The curtain lifts after the show. It’s a nice touch. I have mixed feelings about opening the film with David Johnston’s last words. Particularly since there is no context given in the film about the moments-before-death radio call. The renaming of features after the geologist who died in the 1980 explosion is a good tribute. I had just heard the whole story the day before, so it was really fresh on my mind, how a geologist, doing what he does, was wiped off without a trace.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
I left the Observatory to hike the Hummocks trail. It was more pleasant down there.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
Upstream, Toutle River.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
At the Coldwater Lake parking area, this walked right through.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
I will admit to being a light snob. Everything was so overexposed, almost as soon as the sun came up. So I waited and waited. By about 3p.m., things got really nice. Here, my tripod takes a bow.
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
Mount St. Helens from Coldwater Lake, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
I went back up to Johnston Ridge for sunset. It was pretty chilly, but much less windy. After a whole roll on the Nikomat 35mm, I realized tonight that the metering actually works! So I shot some film up there. But it was kind of hazy. Not having been there before, I missed the good light (again) by a few tens of minutes. The way the mountain is shaped, the western crater edge puts the rest of the mountain in shadow well before sunset. Infrared:
Mount St. Helens, WA, Andrew D. Barron©10/18/11
I snapped a self portrait up there, too.

Monday, October 17, 2011

Eastbound and Down

There was a bluegrass show of three acts in Corbett, OR. Before the show, I spotted this old place.
Corbett, OR, Andrew D. Barron©10/15/11
The turnout was impressive. There were maybe 20% more folks out of view.
Bluegrass at the Columbia Grange Hall, Corbett, OR, Andrew D. Barron©10/15/11
The next day I found myself along the I-5 corridor; the stretch that is something of a Yosemite for Portlanders. There was another waterfall I stopped to shoot, Horse Tail Falls.
Union Pacific line, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
Union Pacific line, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
The Columbia river basalts in the gorge are much like the basalts I once cared so much about in California (the Lovejoy), but at several orders of magnitude more impressive. Columnar jointing.
Horse tail falls, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
Long exposures with the infrared camera are still pretty satisfying.
Horse tail falls, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
On Sunday I went to Hood River for the first time. There was a festival going on, and the place was loaded with tourists. It was sunny and warm. Naturally, the path less traveled appeared. Here I am somewhere around 12th and State, looking at Mt. Adams.
Mt. Adams from Hood River, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
Volcanoes of the Cascades have taken on an unexpected importance.
Fire station, Hood River, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
Appropriate model name.
Columbia bowling ball, Hood River, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
I was pleased to wander into the bike shop just before closing. The brown Schwinn Collegiate dubbed “Hot Chocolate” by my good friend Mr. Kortan will ride again finally.
Building shadows, Hood River, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
The bridge over the Columbia.
Crossing the Columbia, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
Crossing the Columbia after sunset.
Crossing the Columbia, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
I find the Washington side calmer and quieter.
Hood train stop, Washington, Andrew D. Barron©10/16/11
At the prompting of predicted good weather, I will be shooting at Mt. Saint Helens on Tuesday!

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